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His action in telephoning Irene cannot therefore be condoned. He did evil, and it was not even a doing of evil that good might come. Or, at least, thcan you buy bitcoin with paypal credite good, if any, was to be of a private sort, having no connection with the business he was engaged to do. The consequences, which he was far from foreseeing, cannot therefore be a logical credit to him. Yet, whether for evil or good his action was of momentous bearing on the events that followed.

Garson with difficulty suppressed the cry of distress that roseto his lips. For a few moments, the silence was unbroken. Then,presently, Burke, by a gesture, directed the girl to advancetoward the center of the room. As she obeyed, he himself went alittle toward the door, and, when it opened again, and DickGilder appeared, he interposed to check the young man's rushforward as his gaze fell on his bride, who stood regarding himwith sad eyes.cardano news crypto capital ventureGarson stared mutely at the burly man in uniform who held theirdestinies in the hollow of a hand. His lips parted as if he wereabout to speak. Then, he bade defiance to the impulse. Hedeemed it safer for all that he should say nothing--now!... Andit is very easy to say a word too many. And that one may be aword never to be unsaid--or gainsaid.

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Then, while still that curious, dynamic silence endured, Cassidycame briskly into the office. By some magic of duty, he hadcontrived to give his usually hebetudinous features an expressionof enthusiasm."Say, Chief," the detective said rapidly, "they've squealed!"Burke regarded his aide with an air intolerably triumphant. Hisvoice came smug:"Squealed, eh?" His glance ran over Garson for a second, thenmade its inquisition of Mary and of Dick Gilder. He did not givea look to Cassidy as he put his question. "Do they tell the samestory?" And then, when the detective had answered in theaffirmative, he went on speaking in tones ponderous withself-complacency; and, now, his eyes held sharply, craftily, onthe woman."I was right then, after all--right, all the time! Good enough!"Of a sudden, his voice boomed somberly. "Mary Turner, I want youfor the murder of----"Garson's rush halted the sentence. He had leaped forward. Hisface was rigid. He broke on the Inspector's words with a gestureof fury. His voice came in a hiss:"That's a damned lie!... I did it!"

Chapter 24 Anguish And BlissJoe Garson had shouted his confession without a second ofreflection. But the result must have been the same had he takenyears of thought. Between him and her as the victim of the law,there could be no hesitation for choice. Indeed, just now, hehad no heed to his own fate. The prime necessity was to saveher, Mary, from the toils of the law that were closing aroundher. For himself, in the days to come, there would be a ghastlydread, but there would never be regret over the cost of savingher. Perhaps, some other he might have let suffer in hisstead--not her! Even, had he been innocent, and she guilty of thecrime, he would still have taken the burden of it on his ownshoulders. He had saved her from the waters--he would save heruntil the end, as far as the power in him might lie. It was thusthat, with the primitive directness of his reverential love forthe girl, he counted no sacrifice too great in her behalf. JoeGarson was not a good man, at the world esteems goodness. On thecontrary, he was distinctly an evil one, a menace to the societyon which he preyed constantly. But his good qualities, if few,were of the strongest fiber, rooted in the deeps of him. Heloathed treachery. His one guiltiness in this respect had been,curiously enough, toward Mary herself, in the scheme of theburglary, which she had forbidden. But, in the last analysis,here his deceit had been designed to bring affluence to her. Itwas his abhorrence of treachery among pals that had driven him tothe murder of the stool-pigeon in a fit of ungovernable passion."I have answered that already."

"Did you hear anything while you were here? Any sound of voices or other noise? Anything, perhaps, from Mr. Thurlow's room?"No. Nothing at all."M. Samuel changed the subject abruptly:"Mr. Kindell, what business had you in Paris?"

"Nothing very definite.""And the indefinite business was?"

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"Nothing to do with murdering M. Reynard, or anyone else.""Will you answer my question, and leave me to judge of that?""I'm afraid I can't add to the answer I have already given.""Which was no answer at all. . . . Mr. Kindell, do you realize that your attitude must lead, if you are so foolish as to continue it, to your arrest?"

"I don't see what more you can expect me to say. I have told you all I know of the matter, which is practically nothing.""Pardon me that I cannot agree. You admitted in my hearing that M. Reynard was known to you.""He must have been known to very many. There is no crime in that.""But there is a deduction that his call at this hotel was not disconnected with that acquaintance. He knew many who wished that he did not know them. If he called here to detain a gentleman whom he knew to be on the point of leaving Paris - - "

"Then why should he have gone to the floor above?""He may have been unsure of your room."

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"He could have enquired at the desk. . . . Perhaps he did and that would show you that he was not looking for me.""Of course, we have not overlooked that. He made no such enquiry But there is a most likely presumption that he saw you on your way to the floor above, and followed you to this apartment."

"And when he got here, I was ready to crawl up behind him and cut his throat with a knife which I keep ready for such occasions? I should call it a grotesque improbability. And all done without a sound that Mr. Thurlow could hear!""But it was done without any such sound, if Mr. Thurlow is to be believed.""Then you can conclude that Reynard came here with a definite purpose, and that the man who killed him followed him not the other way round - with the equally definite purpose of murder, to prevent whatever he was going to do. Find out why Reynard came to this room, and I should say the murderer would be in the bag."M. Samuel received this advice in a momentary silence, stroking his chin. It was a version of what had occurred which had been present to his own mind, and he saw its probabilities; but he saw also that there were many other possibilities of almost equal plausibility. It was an explanation that might be mere theory, or more probably come from a mind which knew supporting facts which it would not disclose. He was far from sure that he was questioning a guilty man, but he was sure that he could tell him more than he did, and he was resolved both to get at the concealed facts and the motive for their concealment."That may be true enough." he answered. "Though it may not be the only explanation of what occurred. But, if it were adopted by us, it would do nothing to remove the suspicion which rests upon you. You might yourself have followed M. Reynard, rather than he you.""And why in heaven's name should I do that? If you will enquire from the English police, you will find that I have no reputation for crawling up hotel stairs to murder people with knives."

"Murder is not a habit, even with most murderers, Mr. Kindell. And a motive is not difficult to imagine. M. Reynard might have been about to disclose to Mr. Thurlow such things as it would have been to your disadvantage for him to know. Perhaps the lady with whom you returned to England could throw some light upon this?""I returned to England alone. A lady who was also staying here returned on the same boat. But you can ask her anything that you like, so far as I am concerned. You will waste your time, because she can have nothing to tell you."

As Kindell said these last words he had a double doubt. He doubted that they went beyond the truth, for it was possible that a close cross-questioning of a frightened Myra might result in disclosures which would put M. Samuel on the right track, if his own theory were right; and he doubted their wisdom, because it was to his advantage that M. Samuel should be so directed, though he could not openly be the one to do it.But M. Samuel ignored his reply. "She was a lady you knew," he repeated. "You had been out together. You had been entertained in her rooms. . . . Mr. Kindell, I will be plain with you, and you will hear the advice of a man who is much older than you, and more experienced in such matters as this than you can possibly be. I do not know that you killed M. Reynard. But for the fact that someone certainly did, and that it seems to lie between you and another who is an equal improbability, I should call it a most unlikely supposition. And I am impressed by the fact that you came back promptly to face the charge, which was the act of an innocent man, or of a guilty one who is bolder and shrewder than most are. But if you are innocent, you are placing yourself in a great and needless peril; and if you are guilty you are doing yourself harm rather than good by refusing to be frank with me concerning your relations with the dead man, and other matters which may, or may not, have a bearing upon the crime."

"I am sorry. I believe your advice is sincerely given, and I have no doubt it is good. But I can add nothing to what I have said already. I know nothing of the murder, and I am convinced that Mr. Thurlow is equally ignorant. Till you realize that, you will waste your own time, and allow the murderer more to cover his traces, or get away."M. Samuel went on patiently, as though he had not heard this reply: "You must remember that you are now subject to French, not to English, law. When we charge a man with murder, we do not allow him to go to sleep in the dock. We think that your rules of evidence are designed to protect guilty rather than innocent men. However that may be, our methods have this result, that an accused person must give a coherent and detailed account of his own actions or fall under a suspicion which will almost certainly result in a verdict of guilt, with all its consequences, being recorded against his name.

"In practice, such refusals seldom, if ever, occur. An accused person will always put forward a detailed account of his own movements and relationships to the crime, and it is upon the degree to which they obtain credence, or collapse on close examination, that his fate will largely depend.""I have no doubt that there is a good deal to be said for your practice," Kindell replied, "and there may be something to be said for ours; but I've got to take things as they are, and nothing alters the fact that I've told you all I can, and the sooner you realize that neither Mr. Thurlow nor I had anything to do with the murder, the sooner you're likely to get on the right track."M. Camuel rose. He said: "Mr. Kindell, you must not think me rude if I quote a proverb of your own country. Experience keeps a dear school - - "" - but fools will learn in no other. You need not hesitate to complete it. Will you think me even ruder than you if I add that there are some whom even that school seems unable to teach? . . . Surely your experience should enable you to distinguish between innocent and guilty men."

M. Samuel showed no sign of offence at the implications of this reply. He said:"You will give me your word, Mr. Kindell, that you will remain here?"

"I did not come back for the purpose of running away. I shall not leave the hotel without letting you know.""I accept your word." M. Samuel bowed and left.

Chapter 14 Kindell As A Live:BaitAS M. SAMUEL left, Mr. Thurlow and Irene returned to the room.

"I hope," the ambassador said, "that you have been able to give the police the information which they require."His tone was that of one who is unsure whether he has cause for quarrel or complaint, or of how serious it may be; and there was no satisfaction to be found in Kindell's reply, "I told him what I told you, that I know nothing about it at all.""But after he had heard you say that you knew the dead man he would want something better than that.""Then it's something that he can't get."

"If he should arrest you, you'll find that that will be a very dangerous attitude to adopt.""I'll worry about that if he tries it on."

"Will," Irene interposed, looking at him with troubled eyes, "I don't know why you're making such a mystery of it, but if you really weren't here when it happened, is it quite fair to Father - or me? It's plain to everyone that you know something you're holding back, and, if you'd be frank about it, whatever else it did, it couldn't help getting Father out of the mess.""You're quite sure that that would be the result?"

"It seems sense to me.""Well, I'm sorry I can't say more. The whole trouble is that M. Samuel heard me say more than I ought to have done to you."

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Perspectives of a 2x entrepreneur turned VC at @UpfrontVC#

Mark Suster

Written by

2x entrepreneur. Sold both companies (last to salesforce.com). Turned VC looking to invest in passionate entrepreneurs 〞 I*m on Twitter at @msuster

Both Sides of the Table

Perspectives of a 2x entrepreneur turned VC at @UpfrontVC, the largest and most active early-stage fund in Southern California. Snapchat: msuster

Mark Suster

Written by

2x entrepreneur. Sold both companies (last to salesforce.com). Turned VC looking to invest in passionate entrepreneurs 〞 I*m on Twitter at @msuster

Both Sides of the Table

Perspectives of a 2x entrepreneur turned VC at @UpfrontVC, the largest and most active early-stage fund in Southern California. Snapchat: msuster